Field Trips

Maps

Nicaragua
Dec. 2005-Jan. 2006

Nicaragua
Dec. 2004-Jan. 2005

Nicaragua
Dec. 2003-Jan. 2004

Nicaragua
Dec. 2002-Jan. 2003

Nicaragua
Dec. 2001-Jan. 2002

Nicaragua
Dec. 2000-Jan. 2001

Nicaragua
Dec. 1999-Jan. 2000

Nicaragua
May-June, 1999

Nicaragua
Dec. 1997-Jan. 1998

Nicaragua
Dec. 1996-Jan. 1997

Nicaragua
Dec. 1995-Jan. 1996

Costa Rica
May-June, 1994

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled Document
About Nicaraguan Folk Art


The painting on the previous page is an example of what is known as primitive or naive art. Folk art of this type occurs throughout the world and Nicaraguan folk art has recently become much admired. Below is a summary of an article on the subject, by Porfirio Garcia Romano, "El primitivismo en la década de los años sententa," that appeared in the Nicaraguan newspaper, El Neuvo Diaro, on October 17, 1998. The summary of this article was prepared by Ovide Bastien.


Otra Llegada by Oscar Mairena.*

In the 1970's, under the leadership of Ernesto Cardenal, priest, poet and former Minister of Culture in the Sandinista government in Nicaragua, a group of fishermen and campesinos developed a school of painting that became known as Escuela Primitivista de Solentiname. This form of art has now achieved international fame.

The school started when Ernesto Cardenal, while travelling in the area for the first time, observed one of the local residents drawing a cup. Impressed by his talent, Cardenal supplied him with paper and coloured pencils. Later, he had the noted Nicaraguan painter, Roger Pérez de la Rocha, travel to the area to teach the local people some painting techniques.

By 1974 the campesinos and fishermen of the archipelago of Solentiname were busy painting scenes taken from their daily lives. These paintings were soon exposed in art galleries in Managua, New York, Paris and elsewhere.

Besides depicting their lifestyle and values, the painters incorporated a religious current that had a deep impact on them: liberation theology. For example, the painting of Gloria Guevara, "Cristo Guerillero," drawn in 1975, depicts a saviour who is oppressed, like the people with whom he is identified, and who acts, from below, as their liberator. Painting, fighting against oppression and practicing their religion, melt into one unique reality. Between religion and revolution, the distance disappeared.


Christo Guerillero by Gloria Guevara.

 

* Both images are from E. Cardenal, Tocar el cielo, (Poesías illustrado con pinturas de Solentiname y fotografías del nuevo Nicaragua), Managua: Editorial Nueva Nicaragua, Ediciones Monimbó, nd.